The March

Finally. Hello again.

No excuses. JukeboxHeart.com has been inactive for far too long. We’ve been barely breathing in the background, maintaining the FM program and little by little redesigning the site to be a bit more user friendly. But you don’t care about that. Herewith is our first music entry in many, many months.

I’ve also been cleaning house at home and have come up with a few choice things to post here in the relaunch of JukeboxHeart.com. I’ve had numerous requests for the material from this band, so I decided this would be the music to re-open JukeboxHeart.com

The band is The March, and they were active in the mid 1980s in Providence, Rhode Island. They gigged a lot in town at places like The Rocket, The Living Room and AS220. They were dark, decidedly postpunk, and definitely fans of Joy Division with songs patterned after Atrocity Exhibition and Interzone.

march

The March – “Otherself” cassette, plus three live performances

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The March – Ten Song Demo

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I was friends with Eric Moffat, lead guitarist, until he left Providence for San Francisco in search of better musical tidings.

There is little, if any, information remaining about the band. They officially released one cassette, Otherself. But their impact on the live scene cannot be overstated. At the time, I was doing radio at WCUW in Worcester, and Eric ran off a special copy of Otherself for me, which included three live tracks, and that cassette is presented here in its entirety.

Additionally, Eric gave me the 10 Song Demo as shown in the photo, including studio versions of songs they played live. I believe these songs remain unreleased to this day, and even many who saw the band live and knew them in the local scene have never heard these studio versions. The track listing, if it ever existed at all, is long lost.

The mp3’s you will listen to have been culled from cassette tapes that are over 25 years old, and as such, have suffered some age degradation. I’ve restored them as much as possible, but they are still not perfect.

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As Recorded Live: Minny Pops

Minny Pops Live, 1980

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Of all the fascinating bands to emerge from the twinned label stable of Factory and Crepuscule in the post-punk era, Dutch electro pioneers Minny Pops are probably the least understood, and least lauded. Which is a great pity, since much of their output still impresses today as powerful and original experimental music. The creative anchor to Minny Pops was Wally van Middendorp, a key figure in Amsterdam’s underground Ultra art movement, and founder of the Plurex label in early 1978. His first single, as Tits, coupled We’re Glad Elvis Is Dead with Daddy Is My Pusher (PLUREX 001), and was a fairly typical new wave record, though darkly humorous.

In September of that year Minny Pops were formed as a predominantly electronic band, taking their name from a primitive Korg rhythm box named Mini Pops, and having something in common with Suicide, The Normal and Human League. The first line-up, featuring Wally on vocals and drum machine with bassist Frans Hagenaars, guitarist Peter Mertens and two dancers, including Wally’s brother Rob, made their live debut on December 12th at the Brakke Grond in Amsterdam.

The band returned home to play a Dutch tour with The Tapes in May, which resulted in a rush-released Minny Pops Live ep (PLUREX 0016) in June, featuring Night Out, Dolphin’s Spurt and Mental, later recorded as Een Kus. In August the group returned to Manchester to record their debut Factory single, and complete a short headlining tour of the north of England in August, taking in Leeds Warehouse, Sheffield Blitz and Manchester Beach Club. The image above is the band in 1979.

There is a scant website for the band. It doesn’t have much information, but does provide links to various other sites featuring more about this great and elusive band, including availability of their reissues on Les Temps Modernes, so check it out!

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Special Report: Muddy Waters at the Newport Jazz Festival 1960

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This stands as one of the most transformational performances of all time. It was this concert, a blues segment at 1960 Newport Jazz Festival in Newport Rhode Island, that brought the blues out of smokey basement clubs and into the mainstream. It was recorded on July 3, 1960, exactly 50 years ago today.

As sublime luck would have it, I happened across a pristine copy of this LP, still enrobed in torn, flapping shreds of yellowed shrink wrap, parts of which were intact enough for me to be able to call this LP SEALED. But the timing of this was so right, of course it was going to land here in Jukebox Heart.

This a superb set of live blues. Muddy is backed for the set by James Cotton on harmonica, the great Otis Spann on piano, Pat Hare on rhythm guitar, bassist Andrew Stevenson, and oe of the best blues drummers ever, Francis Clay. The performances are straightahead Delta favored Chicago blues highlighted by an explosive take of “(I’m Your) Hoochie Coochie Man”.

The concert was filmed, and although it has deteriorated significantly over time, it’s still good enugh to enjoy seeing the man perform live:

As Recorded Live: A Certain Ratio

As Recorded Live, another new category for Jukebox Heart, brings you legendary live tracks. We kick off the category with A Certain Ratio, from the concert released on their cassette, “The Graveyard and The Ballroom”, released January 1980.

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Click the above arrow to hear A Certain Ratio perform All Night Party, Oceans and The Choir.

Released during Factory Records’ formative years. One side studio (Produced by Martin Hannett in September 1979) and one side live (recorded live by Jeff Hooper and Tony Wilson). The live tracks are taken from the legendary performance at the Electric Ballroom, London, October 1979, opening for Talking Heads. From an early cassette edition of this concert, originally released by Factory in a very limited edition, this has subsequently been released on CD, but the original format is a must have: a cassette housed in a transparent “evening bag”. The first 400 copies were in an orange pouch with insert. Later copies in blue, green, brown, red, and grey pouches. Collect them all for every outfit and season…